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Apr 28

An Old Wound Rears its Head . . .

A short time ago I asked the people on my writing blog to let me know what they wanted me to write about. (I was running out of ideas). And what should they ask, but how to write humor and how to put emotion into your writing?

*sigh*

I have no idea about how to write humor, so that’s something I’ll have to research. But the emotion thing . . .

I used to feel solid about reaching my readers emotionally until I got a harsh critique from an editor I was querying–they said my dialogue was sterile and emotionless. It drained my confidence, and I’m still getting over it. But instead of shying away like I would have at one point in my life, I moved forward. But I still couldn’t put my finger on what the editor was talking about. What connects readers to writing?

But thinking about this question my reader asked, I think I have it:

-Character

-Plot

-Word Choice

At the very least those three topics are a start. See, you need a character that readers will identify with—someone they care about. Otherwise, who cares if anything happens to them? Then the plot needs to create a vivid environment where they can feel the danger or sadness or whatever. Then the word choice will underscore the characterization and the plot. Stronger words=stronger writing.

As I continue to think about and prepare to post on this topic, I may come up with more ideas on how to put emotion in writing. But I’m glad I figured out where to start.

-:heart: M.R. Anglin

2 comments

  1. Kessie

    Rayne Hall has a series of little tutorial books that I can’t recommend enough. I picked up the one on vivid dialogue because I was trying to up my game. My goodness, it’s amazing. From compressing dialogue to writing through the character’s paradigm, it’s a gold mine. Anything you need help with, check those books out.

    As for humor: very high drama over very low stakes. Is the hero battling monsters just to get a donut? That’s humor. The greater the contrast between the conflict and the stakes, the better.

    1. M.R. Anglin

      Thanks for the tips. I’ll definitely look into those books.

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